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Connecticut Motorcycle Helmet Law

This list of Connecticut motorcycle helmet laws is a reference only and you should always refer to the Connecticut D.O.T. for current requirements. Please e-mail us if you believe our Connecticut motorcycle helmet law information is out of date or otherwise incorrect.

In Connecticut, no one under 18 is permitted to operate or ride on a motorcycle without wearing a motorcycle helmet.

LIMITED: 
MOTORCYCLE HELMETS REQUIRED FOR ALL RIDERS UP TO AGE 18 
MOTORCYCLE HELMETS REQUIRED FOR NOVICES OR PERMIT HOLDERS 

STATUTE:

Title 14. Motor Vehicles. Use of the Highway by Vehicles. Section 14-249. Protective headgear for motorcyclists and passengers under eighteen years old. 
"(a) On and after January 1, 1990, no person under eighteen years of age may operate a motorcycle, as defined in section 14-1, and no person under the age of eighteen may be a passenger on a motorcycle, unless such person is wearing protective headgear of a type which conforms to the minimum specifications established by regulations adopted under subsection (b) of this section. (See "Standards" below.)
(c) . . . Any operator or passenger of a motorcycle or motor-driven cycle who is under eighteen years of age shall at all times, while operating or riding on such motorcycle or motor-driven cycle, wear a protective helmet on his head in an appropriate manner safely secured."

FINE:

Title 14. Motor Vehicles. Use of the Highway by Vehicles. Section 14-249. Protective headgear for motorcyclists and passengers . . .. 
"(c) Any person subject to the provisions of subsection (a) of this section (see above) who fails to wear protective headgear which conforms to the minimum specifications established by such regulations shall have committed an infraction and shall be fined not less than ninety dollars."


STANDARDS:

Title 14. Motor Vehicles. Use of the Highway by Vehicles. Section 14-249. Protective headgear for motorcyclists and passengers under eighteen years old. 
"(b) The commissioner of motor vehicles shall adopt regulations in accordance with the provisions of chapter 54 and the provisions of the Code of Federal Regulations Title 49, Section 571.218, as amended, establishing specifications for protective headgear for use by operators and passengers of motorcycles."

MISCELLANEOUS MOTORCYCLE LAWS


State Funded Rider Education 
Available for all eligible applicants. 
Required under age 18. 
May waive skills test for successful completion of rider ed. 

Eye Protection 
Required by law unless equipped with windscreen. 

Daytime Use Of Headlight 
Required by law for vehicles manufactured during or after 1980. 
Modulating headlight permitted

Passenger Seat 
Required if carrying a passenger. 

Passenger Footrests 
Required if carrying a passenger. 

Mirror 
Required by law. 

Periodic Safety Inspection 
Random inspections, required by law.

DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF CLOTHING OR CLUB MEMBERSHIP IS ILLEGAL

The Connecticut Statute prohibiting discrimination in public accommodations is Section 46a-64 of the Connecticut General Statutes Annotated which states, in pertinent part "[i]t shall be a discriminatory practice in violation of this Section to deny any person within the jurisdiction of this State full and equal accommodations in anyplace of public accommodation, resort or amusement because of race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, marital status, age, mental retardation, mental disability or physical disability..." Any person whose exercise or enjoyment of rights secured by the Constitution of the laws of the United States has been interfered with, or attempted to be interfered with may bring a complaint to the Connecticut State Commission of Human Rights and Opportunities. The United States Supreme Court ruled in the case of Cohen a Connecticut, 403 US 15 (1971) that individuals have the constitutional right under the First Amendment to wear clothing which displays writing or designs. In addition, the right of an individual to freedom of association has long been recognized and protected by the United States Supreme Court Thus, a person's right to wear the clothing of his choice, as well as his right to belong to any club or organization of his choice is constitutionally protected, and persons or establishments who discriminate on the basis of clothing or club membership are subject to lawsuit.