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North Dakota Motorcycle Helmet Law

This list of North Dakota motorcycle helmet laws is a reference only and you should always refer to the North Dakota D.O.T. for current requirements.  Please e-mail us if you believe our North Dakota motorcycle helmet law information is out of date or otherwise incorrect.

North Dakota has helmet laws that exempt adult riders, riders over the age of majority -- 18 years old and over!

Motorcycle Helmet Statue: 
Title 39. Motor Vehicles. Chapter 39-10.2. Motorcycles. 39-10.2-06 Equipment for Motorcycle Riders. : 
"1. No person under the age of eighteen years may operate or ride upon a motorcycle unless protective headgear, which complies with standards established by the department, is being worn on the head of the operator and rider, except when participating in a lawful parade. If the operator of a motorcycle is required to wear protective headgear, any passenger must also wear protective headgear regardless of the age of the passenger. 
"2. This section does not apply to persons riding within an enclosed cab or on a golf cart.

"3. No person may operate a motorcycle if a person under the age of eighteen years is a passenger upon that motorcycle and is not wearing protective headgear as provided in subsection 1."

STANDARDS:

Title 39. Motor Vehicles. Chapter 39-10.2. Motorcycles. 39-10.2-06 Equipment for Motorcycle Riders. : 
" . . . protective headgear which complies with standards established by the department . . ."

State Funded Rider Education 
Available for all eligible applicants. 
Required under age 16. 

Daytime Use Of Headlight 
Modulating headlight permitted. 

Passenger Seat 
Required if carrying a passenger. 

Passenger Footrests 
Required if carrying a passenger. 

Mirror 
Required by law. 

65 MPH Speed Limit 
In effect on designated rural interstate highways. 

NORTH DAKOTA: DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF CLOTHING OR CLUB MEMBERSHIP IS ILLEGAL

The laws of the State of North Dakota make it a crime to prevent or hinder any person from exercising his or her civil rights. Any person whose rights have been breached in such a manner may bring legal action against the interfering person. Such an action can include compensatory monetary damages. The United States Supreme Court has ruled in support of this in the case of Cohen v. California, 403 US 15 (1971). Thus, a person's right to wear the clothing of his or her choice, as well as the right to belong to any club or organization of his or her choice, is constitutionally protected, and persons or establishments who discriminate on the basis of clothing or club membership are subject to lawsuit.