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Arkansas Motorcycle Helmet Law

This list of Arkansas motorcycle helmet laws is a reference only and you should always refer to the Arkansas D.O.T. for current requirements.  Please e-mail us if you believe our Arkansas motorcycle helmet law information is out of date or otherwise incorrect.

Arkansas motorcycle helmet law


MOTORCYCLE HELMETS REQUIRED FOR ALL RIDERS UNDER 21 

Arkansas law requires motorcycle operators and passengers under 21 to wear a helmet. All operators and riders, however, regardless of age, must wear protective glasses, goggles or transparent face shields.

STATUTE:

Chapter 20, Operation of Motorized Cycles; Subchapter 1. Motorcycles, motor-driven cycles, and motorized bicycles; Section 27-20-104 Standard equipment required . . . (b) :
"All passengers and operators of motorcycles and motor-driven cycles used upon the public streets and highways of this state shall be equipped with the following equipment under standards set forth by the Office of Motor Vehicle of the State of Arkansas:

(1) Protective headgear unless the person is twenty-one (21) years of age or older; and 
(2) Protective glasses, goggles, or transparent face shields.

MISCELLANEOUS MOTORCYCLE LAWS


Eye Protection 
Required by law. 

Daytime Use Of Headlight 
Required by law. 
Modulating headlight permitted. 

Passenger Seat 
Required if carrying a passenger. 

Passenger Footrests 
Required if carrying a passenger. 

Mirror 
Required by law. 

Periodic Safety Inspection 
Required by law. 

65 MPH Speed Limit 
In effect on designated rural interstate highways. 

DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF CLOTHING OR CLUB MEMBERSHIP IS ILLEGAL

Article 2, Section 1, 4, and 6 of the Arkansas Constitution guarantees the right to everyone in Arkansas of freedom of speech, expression and association. Cooper V. Henslee. 257 Ark. 963. A person's constitutional right to freedom of speech, expression and association include the right to dress and belong to clubs or organizations of their choice. Individuals and businesses who discriminate against individuals on the basis of their clothing or club membership may be subject to lawsuit.

The United States Supreme Court in the case of Cohen v. California, 403 U.S. 15 (1971), held that individuals have the constitutional right under the First Amendment to wear clothing which displays writing or designs. The right of an individual to freedom and association has long been recognized and protected by the United States Supreme Court. Thus, a person's right to wear the clothing of his choice, as well as his right to belong to any club or organization of his choice is constitutionally protected, and persons or establishments who discriminate on the basis of clothing or club membership are subject to lawsuit.